Max Weiler in his studio at the academy, 1977

The reversal of the pictorial order that occurred in Weiler’s "Landscapes on resonant Grounds" was limited to the years 1969 to 1972, with a few last examples in 1973. Weiler then returned to his old foundations. Taking them as his point of departure, he developed a painting style characterised by an eye-catching luminosity. Extensive expanses of white ground contrast with widely dispersed, flowing patches of colour. In some cases all material differentiation seems to be consumed by the light.

Weiler felt that his way of representing nature corresponded to a "re-creation of nature that bears no resemblance to it". Only at first glance does that description seem paradoxical. The resemblance between the image and the visible world is now guaranteed by the means available to painting. Those means are used to start a process of creation that generates optical constellations we can behold "like nature". "What I am doing now is born out of egg tempera, out of the pools of paint on the horizontally placed canvas, out of the spraying, dripping, runnning, out of the strata, the solidified shapes, of drying paint. Those are the means that nature offers and that I use; that is the vocabulary with which I speak; those are the forms from which I make paintings, that I use to realise my ideas...... The world was created by very similar powers, which is why there are constant parallels, resemblances, similarities. Art, electricity." (1973)

The very last vestiges of tangible things have disappeared. Yet we miss nothing. They have been replaced by the four cosmic elements known since ancient times: earth, water, air and fire. We speak of an element when we want to describe the raw material of nature or of part of it: everything that is made of water, earth and so on. The four elements represent the potentiality of nature, which becomes concrete at certain moments without losing its elementary force or its mutability. The elements possess a high energy potential and a low degree of material differentiation. Weiler alluded to this with his cryptic remark: "Art, electricity". He indicated that his paintings have to do with energy, with the invisible element the modern world uses as electricity. The word "like" in "like a Landscape "is particularly appropriate in the case of the elements. For they denote something like clouds, like water, like plants and so on.


Another point to note is the horizontality of these paintings, the way they seem to spread broadly outwards. The horizon has vanished; we find ourselves involved in something located at a distance we cannot gauge. Despite this emphasis on breadth, our experiencing of these paintings has much more to do with height. There is a remarkable polarity that endows verticality with an undefined but strong power. The paintings possess a fresh, liberating capacity to raise the viewer's gaze far above the edge of the canvas.

According to Weiler's notes in his "Tag- und Nachtheften", this awareness of nature’s fluid quality goes hand in hand with an equally strong awareness of the "sub-conscious". It would not be wrong to assume that the flow of elements, which repeatedly reorganise themselves into a new whole, are in unison with the flow of memories, feelings and insights that develops in the inner stream of consciousness. The external and the internal merge into one. "For we are in reality as old as the world itself and we have known one another (the air, the night, the stones, the plants, the animals and so on) from time immemorial – somewhere deep down – and still have an inkling of that ..." (1975)

Blue trees and crimson sky, 1973
Egg tempera on canvas
130 x 105 cm
Sammlung Univ.-Prof. Dr. Otto Dapunt
Blue Mountain, 1974
Egg tempera on canvas
100 x 198 cm
Sammlung ORF, Wien
Moss in the middle, 1975
Egg tempera on canvas
200 x 198 cm
Far right: living nature,, 1973
Egg tempera on canvas
256 x 608 cm
Universität Wien, Juridicum
Nature with caput mortuum, 1974
Egg tempera on canvas
256 x 608 cm
Universität Wien, Juridicum
New naturalness. Water, 1976
Egg tempera on canvas
200 x 200 cm
The edge of the hill, 1976
Egg tempera on canvas
200 x 198 cm
Gemäldegalerie der Akademie der bildenden Künste, Wien
Expanse of sky, 1976
Egg tempera on canvas
200 x 198 cm
Above the timberline, 1976
Egg tempera on canvas
256 x 580 cm
Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien
Skyscape, 1977
Egg tempera on canvas
256 x 608 cm
Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien
The clouds of this landscape, 1977
Egg tempera on canvas
200 x 198 cm
Large landscape with hill, 1977
Egg tempera on canvas
100 x 200 cm
Sky and clouds, 1977
Egg tempera on canvas
200 x 198 cm
Tree and stone, 1977
Egg tempera on canvas
100 x 200 cm
Umber tree, 1977
Egg tempera on canvas
200 x 198 cm